De perdidos al rio

Por un centavo, por una libra

-Ponme una ración de chuletas de cordero. -¿Y de postre? -Pues, no debo, estoy intentando perder peso, pero de perdidos al río, ponme un cacho de vuestra famosa tarta -Tendré una ración de chuletas de cordero -¿Y de postre? -Bueno, no debería. Estoy tratando de perder peso. Pero más vale que me cuelguen por oveja que por cordero / Más vale que me vaya de rositas, me comeré un trozo de vuestra famosa tarta

-Es bastante arriesgado y no sé si esto va a funcionar, pero de perdidos al río. A estas alturas no nos queda otra opción -Es bastante arriesgado y no sé si esto va a funcionar, pero de perdidos al río.

There is everything in the lord’s vineyard originating from

This locution could have its origin in battles; one way to defeat the enemy would be to drive him towards the river and leave no other direction to escape as there would be no other way out but to jump into it. Sometimes there is only one option left.

There are two English proverbs that come to mind as having a similar meaning to De perdidos, al río, which are: ‘It’s now or never! (and ‘In for a penny, in for a pound!’ (I’ve already gambled a little, why not risk a lot more?).

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Quote in for a penny, in for a pound

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It is used to indicate that, faced with a very difficult situation, one opts for the most outlandish solution, in this case represented by the decision to jump into the river, for example, in the face of an enemy advance or a fire.

It seems that this phrase comes from the battles, when in other times the main maneuver to defeat the enemy consisted of pushing him until he reached the banks of the river. Thus, having the river behind them, their ability to maneuver would be reduced and they would lose the battle, because they would either throw themselves into the river if they did not want to die or they would surrender.

Like father, like son meaning

Spanish Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, teachers, students and Spanish language enthusiasts in general wanting to discuss the finer points of the language. It only takes a minute to sign up.

It is used to indicate that, faced with a very difficult situation, one opts for the most outlandish solution, in this case represented by the decision to jump into the river, for example, in the face of an enemy advance or a fire.

It seems that this phrase comes from the battles, when in other times the main maneuver to defeat the enemy consisted of pushing him until he reached the banks of the river. Thus, having the river behind them, their ability to maneuver would be reduced and they would lose the battle, because they would either throw themselves into the river if they did not want to die or they would surrender.